Bold action on climate change needed in Copenhagen meet

IF necessity is the mother of invention, we should be looking forward to a breathtakingly innovative agreement on climate change in Copenhagen in December. Such an agreement would not only outline how we should curb greenhouse gas emissions, but also how we could realistically adapt to climate change, and help countries cope with its negative effects.

The increasing threat to life and livelihood posed by climate change is already palpable and the need for effective action agreed in Copenhagen is increasingly urgent. Yet the lack of progress in ongoing climate negotiations raises concern as to whether world governments will be able to reach meaningful agreement in December.

For those living on the frontline —the most vulnerable communities living in risk-prone parts of the world — every day wasted could mean a step closer to food or water insecurity; communities having to move to secure adequate and safe services; or even whole regions emptying as they become unable to sustain life.

Changes in the Arctic are accelerating global climate change. Scientists warn that if the Himalayan glaciers disappear, the impact would be felt by more than one billion people across Asia. What will African farmers do when floods wash away their crops as is happening these days in West Africa? This might sound overdramatic. However, climate change is already increasing the frequency and intensity of extreme natural hazard events, especially floods, storms and droughts.  Writes Bekele-Geleta

Kampala’s garbage sites

I always wonder who is responsible for garbage collection in Kampala city. From what I have gathered, Kampala City Council (KCC) is responsible for this duty. However, it is common to find heaps and heaps of garbage piled on most Kampala streets. Now that the rainy season is here, it leaves a lot to be desired when it come to garbage collection in Kampala! For instance, I took this pictures on my way to work.

Scenarios like this are very common on the streets of Kampala, especially downtown and in slum areas, where I believe KCC officials just decide to keep a blind eye!

So what is KCC doing to address garbage collection? Or what does KCC need to do to address the littering garbage in our precious Kampala?

Quoting KCC, they write on their website, Solid waste collection and garbage management is one of the key services provided by the council.” They go to further say that “KCC has contracted private companies to manage solid waste collection so as to improve the cleanliness of the city. It is estimated that the per capita generation of garbage is one kilogram per day. With a population of about 1.5 million, this works out to about 1500 tons. The council can only manage to dispose of 40% -50% of this. About 80% of this garbage is organic matter which makes it very bulky to handle.”

I was beginning to think that most Ugandans are just dirty citizens who do not mind just littering rubbish anyway they find but on second thought, I thin it is the lack of sensitization on proper waste disposal that is lacking!

It is a very sight to see someone throw a polythene bag anywhere they find even when they have garbage bin in front of them! Still, this gets me thinking why can’t there be laws to punish such culprits?! Or is it that KCC will handle the garbage collection! I do not think at this point they are in position to do so!

For me, I believe that KCC should undertake massive sensitization of the public about the danger of unpropitious waste disposal, make implement laws that will catch the culprits who just on disposing garbage as they feel.